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the parliamentary elections this week. will they satisfy protesters or inflame them? we'll get the king's reaction. then, the prime minister of r h russia dmitry medvedev. some call it a new cold war. who's to blame and will russia help in syria? we'll discuss it all. >>> also, the algerian hostage crisis that left dozens dead. is this a sign of a grave, new terror threat? i'll tell you my view. >>> but, first, here's my take. every year at davos people like me try to get a sense of the mood of the place. take the temperature of people in this frosty mountain resort. obviously, i will give you a highly impressionistic and personal picture, but one i find useful since davod does bring together leaders and government, business and media and even the ngo community from all corners of the world. it is genuinely global in a way that few conferences are. so, what is the mood? well, there's a sense of calm, a relief that many storms that seem like they might be overwhelming like the euro crisis have been weathered. people from america are optimistic. those from emerging markets more so, but everywhere t
elections this week, will they satisfy protesters? or inflame them? we'll get the king's reaction. then the prime minister of russia, dmitry medvedev, relations between the united states and russia are at a new low. some call it a new cold war. who's to blame and will russia help in syria? we'll discuss it all. also the algerian hostage crisis that left dozens dead. is this a sign of a grave new terror threat? i tell you my view. people like me try to get a sense of the mood of the place, take the temperature of the people in this frosty mountain resort. obviously i will give you a highly impressionistic and personal nature. since davos does bring together leaders in government, business, media, even the ngo community from all corners of the world. it is so what is the mood? well, there's a sense of calm, a relief that many storms that seemed like they might be overwhelming, like the euro crisis have been weathered. people from america are optim t optimist optimistic, those from emerging markets more so. but everywhere there is a sense of caution. mpw seeing -- released this week
. president obama emboldened by his re-election has already drawn his so-called line in the sand. now republicans have to come to the proverbial table. perhaps the most powerful republican in washington, eric cantor, says he and his fellow republicans will have a plan and they are ready to deal. >> i think it's important that we be here as members of the u.s. congress. there are six of us who are here. really interested in the discussion about the global economy. obviously, the u.s. economy is still a global leader. we want it to remain that way. the political debate at home has been very much about jobs and the economy. and we're here listening to some of the leaders of the eu and other entities here trying to understand how they're dealing with their problems. and i think coming out of all this will be a renewed sense that in america we can compete and we will compete and we will continue to be the destination for capital and innovation. >> and we've got a natural gas boom, an oil boom, we've got thanks to low interest rates what appears to be some sort of a housing boom. so much mo
concern. i want to play something that ted cruz, newly elected texas senator, republican, had to say this weekend, about gun control. and let's come back and talk about it. >> you know, there actually isn't the so-called gun show loophole, that doesn't exist. any licensed firearm dealer that else at a gun show has to have a background check. what it doesn't apply to is personal sales, one on one. and that's true whether it's at a gun show or -- >> i would point out, the key there is a licensed firearm dealer. some of these people, you can sort of apply as a, you know, you sell at a gun show occasionally, that's the gun show loophole. but, ted cruz gets to speak for lots and lots of people. how do you navigate, whether it's in delaware or nationally with what your father is trying to do, how do you navigate the politics of this? there's a reason the assault weapons ban sunseted in '04, because the politics of it simply didn't sustain. there's a reason barack obama didn't talk all that much about it in 2008. how do you keep the momentum to do something? >> the facts are important. sena
the racial progress our society has made, on the civil rights movement to the re- election of president obama, the pervasive association with black people and the ghetto betrays a persistent cultural lag. it has been two generation since .chools were desegregated if till were alive today, would remember stories of lynchings peppering the "new york times." he would remember the william man -- million -man march. a black man became president of the united states. he would have been 73 had he lived. thank you. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> we have been joined by taylor branch. i will just let you know that we have been speaking. douglas blackmon spoke. elijah anderson spoke. i would invite you to the podium and talk about the attempted second emancipation proclamation. ladies and gentlemen, taylor branch. [applause] >> thank you. thanks, paul. i don't want to pay tribute to the marc commuter line. i was only on for two extra hours. i am glad to be here. i want to pay tribute to the " washington month
that is different this time. because of something very simple. and that is what happened in the last election to republicans. particularly mitt romney with the latino voters. he lost big time. and that's why when i asked senator mccain and others who were standing right here where i'm standing, half a dozen years ago, why this is different, that's why they answered that way. listen to this. senator kennedy stood with you and, senator mccain, you were standing with him, and he said 2007 is the year we must fix our broken system. we must strike while the iron is hot. what makes you think, why is this year different? >> elections. elections. >> the republican party is losing the support of our hispanic citizens. and we realize that there are many issues in which we thing we're in agreement with our hispanic sit steps but this is a preeminent issue for those citizens. >> wolf, it's important to underscore that we really did see some of the people who have been here before, with senator kennedy and others half a dozen years ago, but some newborn faces like marco rubio who of course is an up and co
in the book about this a little. if senator kennedy had been alive, he was so critical to the election of president obama. his endorsement in the pivotal period with the turbulence in turmoil early after south carolina, i think he would have been important inside the system as a push towards something bigger and would have pushed to have more connection to outside the beltway. obama it is now traveling on the country. he is forced to because of the election. if you sit inside the beltway too long and get in the backroom deals -- >> even movements can be cloistered. i remember a dinner during the george w. bush administration in southern california. it was norman lear and his wife, larry david, bob scheer. they were sitting around w eeping in their expensive soup about the fact that we were living in hell. rupert murdoch on the media. george bush was president. norman lear had his pulse on american culture for 30 years. why cannot figure out how to deal -- deliver a message that is important and happening? >> that is important. we can find messages that speak to people where they are. t
. and if there had been no candidate goldwater in 1964, there would have been no president-elect ronald reagan in 1980. it was goldwater who proved his famous time for choosing television address which made him a political star overnight and led to his running for governor of california and eventually president of these united states. david recounts how bill rusher shore up the goldwater committee when money ran short and spirits sagged. skillfully guided young americans for freedom in his early chaotic days and forced some order and discipline on the blind spirits who ran the "national review," expanded the conservative movement through the tv program the advocates, his newspaper column and lectures and champion ronald reagan when other conservatives were somewhat skeptical about the actor turned politician. bill loved american politics, traveling to distant land, and national review's effervescent edit her bill buckley of whom he once said, quote, the most exasperating people in the world are so often the most beloved and he is no exception. david frisk has captured this and more in his sple
, george w. bush. another poll shows since president obama was re-elected, just a third of voters think he has been more bipartisan. but the majority, 55% say he's been more confrontational. does this mean nothing can really get done that's meaningful in washington to solve our nation's national debt and help the economy? we have a former white house political director under president george w. bush and a former chief of staff to west virginia senator joe mansion. >> great to be here. >> eric: matt, let me start with you. how do we get here? >> well, you know, i think about the president i served, george w. bush. when he came to office, he really was concerned about trying to if i understand a way to reach across the aisle because clearly bill clinton left the presidency with high numbers. he worked with ted kennedy. he worked with democrats and signature domestic policy issues and then 9/11 happened and the wars occurred. really, the nation polarized again, right versus left. i don't think we have come out of that. obama inherited that. but he talked about bridging that and governing in a
, chuck schumer of new york and newly elected republican senator ted cruz of texas. welcome back as senator cruz to "meet the press." back to both of you. i want to start on the gun debate. because as i say, even before the second term is officially underway thissy is bait is well underway. here are the highlights of what the president wants to accomplish. universal background checks. he'd like to pursue a ban on high capacity magazines. an assault weapons ban that lapsed in 2004. and he'd like stricter laws on gun trafficking. but senator schumer, just as i challenged wayne lapierre of the nra very hard when this came up, i challenge you as well with a question of, is this really going to make a difference? and rich lawry wrote something that caught my attention in "the national review." no one can write a law against mothers owning guns that one day might be turned against them by deranged sons who then commit horrific acts of murder-suicide. shooting rampages are hard to prevent because they are so often committed by young men with no criminal records who want to die. these ar
there. >> one interpretation of the election is that fracking cost mitt romney the presenthe presi. it really did make a significant difference in what turned out to be swing states. >> it did. >> and not think oklahoma was in place. -- i do not think oklahoma was in place. [laughter] >> our company has doubled the size of our employment base there. we are not huge employers yet. 750 people. that is double what we were three years ago. >> one of the environmental challenges, people worry about what you put down the wells in fracking, but it is mostly water and sand. the problem is what comes up. there is naturally occurring radioactive material down there. there is our sncc, barry m.. -- arsenic, barium. in the early days they would turn the water over to the municipal water authorities, who would water it down until they got down to the legal toxicity levels, and then dump it. the problem was, what do we do with all this waste water. they have decided, let's not a bit. they figured out ways to fill the water -- dum pit. they figured out ways to filter the water. >> that was someth
. >> jennifer: so we saw the same sentiment emerge in israel's elections this week too. the electorate pushed back against conservative benjamin netenyahu. and a new leader gave voice. >> [ inaudible ] these are generations left because of israel's middle class can no longer survive the economics. >> jennifer: his party won the second-most seats after netenyahu's. so this movement really does seem to have some legs and not just in the middle east. we're seeing similar concerns in china. there a boom in highly educated young people has significantly changed the work force in china in the last decade. china now has 11 times as many college students as it did in 1999. and while that sounds like good news, the economy hasn't produced enough white collar jobs, so many of those graduates are unemployed, and wages are stagnated, so this is the challenging new world john kerry is going to face. good news is there is no one more prepared to face it. joining us from skype is zbigniew brzezinski. he is a counselor and trustee at the senator for strategic and international studies.
election, for example, i think the most racially divisive comment of the entire election was joe biden's comment where he said if the republicans win, they are, quote, going to put y'all back in chains. that made my heart weep to see a sitting vice president playing to racial fears and playing on those issues. i think that's unfortunate. i don't think it has any place in politics. >> chuck hagel, you were very tepid on "meet the press" a couple of weeks ago. >> i was. >> now you've met with him, you're more comfortable, you'll support him? >> i am. >> what changed? >> i said on your show that i had real concerns. i spent 90 minutes with him. i asked him very specific questions on the things that troubled me. his answers were forth right. and they were answers that alayed my concerns. should we keep every option on the table to prevent a nuclear iran? yes. i went further. i said, do you think we can tolerate a nuclear iran? he said no. and i said to him, well, then, if we had to use military as the only choice, would you? he said yes. second, i asked him hezbollah and hamas, should they
and in his frustration the administration said, we were elected to govern and whether a national labor relations board or whatever, they wanted to put people in place to govern. i hope what happened thursday night, chris will change this. we had a bipartisan, strong bipartisan vote for some rules changes and included in those rules changes were changes in the way we treat nominees, not only for the courts but for these agencies. let's have a day in court for each one of them, and let's have a hearing and let's have a vote. >> chris: i want to move on to another subject but briefly, i understand the president's frustration, that doesn't mean he can just rewrite the constitution. >> listen, i worked in the congressional branch, legislative branch of our government and i certainly didn't hold up our team, model, whatever it happens to be, whoever the president happens to be, but i want to put it into perspective. we have seen this president denied the opportunity to make appointments. over and over and over again. because one senator happens to hate a particular agency or a particular per
thought the rest of the u.s. >> the republican party who is elected to control the congress the same time as obama was elected are going to cross their arms and they are not going to raise the debt ceiling ultimately unless they get severe spending cuts and the obama administration is not going to give it to them. and you are going to watch the u.s. do crazy, crazy things this year. >> if you are right on those crazy, crazy things, then the rest of us are in for a dreadful, dread full time? >> dreadful. it is going to be so strange for the richest country on earth to cross their arms and say i'm not paying. imagine crossing your arms. you are going to see it this year. >> reporter: now, we have been asking our guests here for the riskometer. on this side we have is the u.s. a bigger threat to global growth in 2013. on this side the e.u. lutnic thinks the u.s. is by far the bigger. as you look overall most people still seem to believe europe is the biggest threat in 2013. by the way, speet tweet me wher think the biggest threat is. >> very official looking. did you make that yourself? >> d
against it and see it as extremely counterproductive. my hope is that, you know, there were just elections yesterday. we don't know what kind of government will be formed or where they will go, but my prayer is that perhaps this can be a moment where we can renew some kind of effort to get the parties into a discussion to have a different track than we have been on over the course of the last couple of years. and i would like to reserve all of the capacity to be able to do that, so i'm just going to stop with what i've said, but unilateral efforts are not helpful. we oppose them coming and we -- i don't think symbolic or other kinds of efforts are what we need. we need real negotiation, we need real results, we need progress. saxby three. two weeks ago some of us returned from afghanistan seeing the operations there. you described well i think in your opening statement about the progress being made to the afghan security forces to take over. if we take back and look at iraq for a minute, some of us traveled there in a couple of years before that conflict ended, and we saw some of the build
with the election of abi who wants to finally get japan out of what's close to two decades of what you might call a lost period of time. and he's come forth, as you know, with this new stimulus package which is equivalent to 116 billion u.s., 10 trillion yen, 2.2% of gdp. a lot of that would go for infrastructure, a lot to the north for earthquake area. but, of course, we've seen 14 such packages since the late 1990s. and this one has to be different. and also he's pressing the bank of japan. of last time i was here was to -- last time i was here was to introduce governor shirakawa several years ago who i think is a very good governor of one of the major central banks in the world, pressing him to put in more monetary stimulus which i think is necessary. but i, one of the points that was made right in this room several years ago by the governor, and i've been with him three times in the last two months, is, you know, monetary and fiscal stimulus aren't enough. in the case of japan, you need major deregulation. i think major structural reforms, deregulation in the service area. so hopefully that'l
in a general election. opinion polls suggest they'll keep prime minister benjamin netanyahu in power. netanyahu called early elections in october after his coalition failed to agree on the annual budget. his likud party and his nationalist coalition party israel betananu have led in the polls. the party opposes peace talks with the palestinians. netanyahu resumed the building of jewish settlements in occupied territories two years ago. the construction breaches international law and contributed to a breakdown in the peace process. >>> the prime minister has devoted quite a bit of time urging the bank of japan to do something. what's he hoping for? >> the prime minister has been very adamant about getting japan out of deflation. he doesn't feel his administration can do that task alone. that's why he's asking for simultaneously monetary action. the policy makers are about to give abe what he's been pushing for the bank of japan officials will likely announce a 2% inflation target. the target is part of abe's plan to tackle inflation with bolder, monetary easing measures. board members will decid
elections, which are meant to be different than legislative elections -- remember that we have two branches of government that the framers decided would be controlled by a majority vote. that is the executive and legislative. they did a pretty good job of keeping their fingers in the air, right? i think that people have a right to lobby. i think for people do not have the same access as rich people. i think for people have a lot of things that they cannot do because of the resources they have available, but i think lobbying in general, as long as it is not anything that is secretive, and that is one of the big problems in lobbying -- the secret of aspects of it -- but as long as they do not violate the law, there is going to be lobbying. i think a bigger problem and one that i'm glad i have a couple of minutes to talk about, is the political action committees coming into states and targeting judges. that is a huge problem. look at what happened in iowa. you had a supreme -- you know about the judges that got removed? we do not know about that? ok, let me talk about that for a second year of
. thank you. democrats meeting here in washington re-elected florida congresswoman debbie waserman schultz as the chairwoman. teaming officials concern they will name the fundraising bundleer henry munoz iii of san antonio as the finance chair. officials in texas say three people were wounded in shooting at a community college north of houston. it happened at the north harris campus of the lone star college system. authorities say a fight between two people, one a stunt, led to gunfire. both were wounded and hospitalized. maintenance man was caught in the crossfire and wounded. fourth person was hospitalized. one report said that person may have suffered a heart attack. 40 years ago today, right for abortion was established with the roe v. wade case. shannon bream has more on where we are now. >> the issue of the roe v. wade opinion 40 years ago does little to settle the debate over abortion. pro-life advocates have tange their fight to the state level where the legislators across the country enacted numerous laws aimed to rolling back roe, sparking battles over required ultra sounds and r
and school safety. a night to remember for the obamas and for the nation that re-elected the president. i'm steve handelsman, nbc news, washington. >>> president obama never used the words "democrat" or "republican" in his second inaugural address, but his political message was clear, progressive policies along with a directive for leaders that define us as individuals and as a country. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid and social security, these things do not sap our initiative, they strengthen us. they do not make us a nation of takers. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. we will respond to the threat of climate change. knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. we, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. and we must be a source of hope to the poor, the sick, the marginalized, the victims of prejudice. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. our journey is not com
this conversation with lou about nine or ten days after the election. he came in to speak to our 34 new members. and before he went over to talk to them, he came to my office. he is moaning and groaning. i said, lou, would you stop? we're americans. we'll figure this out. and i just spent 15 minutes giving lou holtz a pep talk. >> and that's your morning dish of "scrambled politics." >>> and now for a look at the national weather, here is bill karins with the forecast. it's cold, right? >> lou holtz isn't happy all that's come out either. here's what we're dealing with out there this morning. snow has made its presence in the washington, d.c. area. we haven't had a lot over this winter period, especially think morning from washington, d.c., southward driving through virginia to fredericksburg, also into areas of southern maryland. we picked up between a dusting to two inches, just enough to make it slippery. so keep that in mind traveling anywhere near. it looks like it will last another hour or two. it looks like a little snow towards hamptons area and virginia beach. yesterday obviously the c
overseas trips that he made in 28 years on foreign relations committee, his work to ensure free elections in the philippines, his work with aids in africa, his work as chairman of the new start treaty and his very public and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sedan. -- sudan. historians will be judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy at much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i want to ask john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to eject. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he has been to egypt and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator has -- it is what we d
election. we are losing dramatically in the hispanic vote, which we think should be ours for a variety of reasons. and we've got to understand that. second, we cannot go on forever with 11 million people living in this country in the shadows under an illegal status. we cannot forever have children who were born here, or brought here by their parents when there were small children and live in the shadows as well. so i think the time is right. host: that was senator john mccain. president obama and will be in las vegas on tuesday to lay out his vision on immigration. at c-span.org for all of our coverage of that event and when we finalize coverage details. the enormous object of the role of the united states on a world stage, we will go to kirby from quincy, illinois, on the democratic line. caller: thank you. i have been listening to some of these people calling in and criticizing mrs. clinton, criticizing the this and that. everyone needs to stop and think about it does. look back to the 1960's when kennedy was president and when he started trying to pull people out of vietnam. what wa
. >> everybody got quiet. good afternoon. welcome to the heritage foundation and to our elected by the was lerman auditorium. we welcome those who are joining a some of these occasions on our heritage website. for those and house as we prepare to begin, please make sure cell phones had been turned off. it is a courtesy that the speakers to appreciate. we will oppose the program within 24 hours on our heritage home page for your further reference as well. hosting our event today is steven bougie. director of r. douglass and sarah alice and center for policy studies. he previously served as senior research fellow for defense. the homeland security. he is well versed in the special area operations and cyber security areas as well as defense support to civil authority. he served for three decades as an army special forces officer in top pentagon official. in july 2001 he assumed the duties of military assistant to secretary rumsfeld and work daily with the secretary for the next five and a half years. upon retirement from the army continued at the pentagon as deputy assistant secretary of defense hom
this. there'll be elections in italy and we will see how we does. but you need popular mandates to get changes really through. i'm encouraged with the ireland. they're making good progress getting back to the market but there's still a lot of problems. the latest victim is cyprus. the banks held a lot of greek paper. they ran up the deficit there, and so they are the latest bailout case that we are going to see. that each country is different, and that leads to what is the same, and that's contagion. europeans did not want to see that there was contagion at the time of greece. and no matter who you talk to with a few i think exceptions, policymakers, they thought they would be no contagion out of greece in 2010. well, we know there's been plenty of contagion. the minister of finance of germany an made a statement to a group of us in tokyo at the imf meetings there a couple months ago. when he was asked what was the biggest mistake you made so far in the european debt crisis, and he said we did not understand and did not accept the idea of contagion. and boy, europe has paid for that co
barber says we should have won the presidential election. and you had different people had different things to say. and i thought one of the more interesting was bobby jindal, the governor of louisiana. boy, he laid it out on the line. so let's just listen to what mr. jindal had to say. >> we've got to stop being the stupid party. it's no secret we have a number of republicans that damagedly the brand this year with offensive and bizarre comment. i'm here to say we've had enough of that. >> schieffer: so there you go. newt gingrich, you ran and tried to get the nomination to run for president. bobby jindal has a point, though, doesn't he? >> it's ironic in 1976, irvin crystal wrote an essay for the "wall street journal" entitle the the stupid party which i commend every republican. ronald reagan came along with jack kemp and they basically moved us back to being an idea-oriented party. i think we clearly have to change. i don't agree-- i mean, maybe we could have won or not won this year. i was certainly wrong. i thought we would win up until about 5:30 election day. i wrote a paper
another term and how the election results for our closest ally in the middle east could affect the region. >> plus what it means for an impending showdown with iran. we'll go inent did and...what!!?? an article that says a typical family pays $155,000 in "wall street" fees on their 401(k)s? seriously? seriously. you don't believe it? search it, "401k 155k." then go to e-trade. and roll over your old 401(k)s to a new e-trade retirement account. we have every type of retirement account. none of them ch and all of them offer low cost investments. why? becae we're not your typical wall street firm, that's why. so you keep more of your money. e-trade. less for us. more for you. uma: fox news alert. firefighters on the scene of a three-alarm fire. that is in a three-store residence in lin, massachusetts. this is 10 miles north of downtown boston. firefighters are on the scene battling the blaze. we will have more details as we get them. jon: a brand new study links the use of aspirin to an increase risk of blindness. risk is live at the breaking news desk with that. rick? >> this is an importan
is supposed to be for the people. it is not. we really don't elect the president no more. the electoral votes do. we don't have any say. we are the ones that just keep paying. we are paying more and more and more taxes all the time. so there's always some reason they've got to have more money. why don't they take some money out of their pockets for one year? let them learn to live like we do. they all live way above their means. does not take a half million dollars or zero million dollars a year to live.- -- it does not take a half million dollars or $1 million a year to live. host: we have members of congress coming in this morning and we will throw out your proposal to them to see what they think. on twitter -- here's a headline in the washington post. let's hear or twice house secretary jay carney hata said. [video clip] >> the bill still has to overcome concerns expressed by members of the house and senate before it can pass both chambers and reached the president's desk. if it does and it reaches his desk, he will not stand in the way of the bill becoming law. broadly speaking, i will po
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 82 (some duplicates have been removed)